AARAKSHAN MOVIE REVIEW BY TARAN ADARSH

A Prakash Jha film is talked about for more reasons than one. It provides food for thought. It sets you thinking. Be it DAMUL, MRITYUDAND, GANGAAJAL, APAHARAN or RAAJNEETI, there was enough fodder in each of those films. Besides, each of those films left an indelible impression on the minds of the viewer. So, quite naturally, the expectations from his new release AARAKSHAN are enormous. This one also tackles a rather serious social issue — caste-based reservation. However, AARAKSHAN not only talks about reservation, but also about the commercialization of educational institutions.

Not many storytellers have repeatedly succeeded in creating pragmatic films on societal matters, but Jha holds the distinction of doing so in film after film. Be it DAMUL [on bonded labor], MRITYUDAND [on gender inequity], GANGAAJAL [also about the contentious blinding episode at Bhagalpur], APAHARAN [on the abduction situation in Bihar] or RAAJNEETI [on the political state of affairs], Jha’s cinema has always illustrated harsh realism in a transfixing and riveting manner.

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We believe in equal rights for all and yet, we continue to be a caste-based society. Through AARAKSHAN, Jha portrays the agony that the youth goes through. The film-maker wants the spectator to comprehend matters around one of the most controversial policies of caste-based reservations in government jobs and educational institutions, a hitherto untouched theme for Hindi cinema.

Like Jha’s earlier attempts, AARAKSHAN is, without doubt, a high-voltage socio-political drama. But, most importantly, it takes on issues head-on, without mincing words. However, the storyteller ensures that the film, at no point, gets preachy or drifts into the sermonizing mode. Like Jha’s films, AARAKSHAN has a story to tell and several super dramatic moments. Sure, it takes time to comprehend what’s going on initially, due to the fact that the film has multiple characters and too much seems to be happening from the start itself, but things fall in place as the story moves forward and the tension starts escalating. While the first hour leaves a hammer-strong impact and is captivating in most parts, it’s the second hour that comes across as a mixed bag. More on that later!

AARAKSHAN tells the story of Prabhakar Anand [Amitabh Bachchan], the idealistic principal of a college that he has single-handedly turned into the state’s best. It is the story of his loyal disciple, Deepak Kumar [Saif Ali Khan], who will do anything for his Sir. Of Deepak’s love for Prabhakar’s daughter Poorbi [Deepika Padukone], of his friendship with Sushant [Prateik].

Centered on one of the most controversial issues of recent years, the story suddenly becomes a rollercoaster ride of high drama, conflict and rebellion, which tests their love and friendship for one another and their loyalty to Prabhakar Anand.

Gender bias and caste-based politics are two paramount problems plaguing our society and it’s not easy to depict these two issues with accuracy on screen. I am no one to comment whether AARAKSHAN would be able to throw up any enduring solution to the problem, but I am sure that the film would seize your mind and make you deliberate on the issues facing the nation. And that, to me, is akin to accomplishing what Jha must’ve set out when he green-lit AARAKSHAN. One also relates to the subject instantly because it mirrors the thoughts of a common man, since every family is genuinely concerned about the education and job their child will get.

At the cost of repeating myself, I’d like to say that the dramatic moments in AARAKSHAN make it a riveting experience. The conflict between Amitabh and Manoj Bajpayee in particular and the turn of events during the post-interval portions leave a solid impression, but the narrative tends to get lengthy and a tad uninteresting and repetitive towards the second hour specifically. The conflict between Amitabh and Manoj is well presented and moves to the next level in the second hour, but the sequences thereafter, when Amitabh, Deepika, Saif and even Prateik start conducting classes and educating the students, dilute the impact generated by the first hour. Also, the culmination to the story, when a full-blown confrontation between the government officials and commoners takes place, though well executed, could’ve been more impactful. In short, the excessive length of the film, more specifically towards the second hour, acts as a deterrent.

Rest On this LInk http://www.bollywoodhungama.com/movies/review/14307/index.html

5 Comments

  1. SRM
    SRM
    August 11, 2011 at 5:17 PM

    Prakash Jha’s films scripts are always, from the beginning till interval will hold the grip. After interval and towards climax always he seems to loose the plot. The above review depicts the same. Word of Mouth publicity will help the movie.

  2. Sandyman
    Sandyman
    August 11, 2011 at 5:17 PM

    Taran has lost it……He says second half is a bit boring yet gives 4 star ratings……Wat the hell?

  3. Ihab
    Ihab
    August 11, 2011 at 5:33 PM

    One should never ask whats Taran’s rating of a film. The big question is – whether he is orgasmic or if he is acting like a “critic”. If its the former, then the movie has been liked/loved by Taran and if its the latter, then he is still confused what his opinions are.

    Adding to the orgasmic feeling is also the feeling the movie will be big at BO.

  4. Dino
    Dino
    August 11, 2011 at 5:44 PM

    This same thing happened with Raajneti ,its first half was superb but last 30 mins was just repetitive stuff and drag. Agree with SRM above a lot of Jha movies follow this trend. There is enough in this review though for me to see it atleast. Will catch it this weekend for sure.

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