NAACHGAANA

  • NG Opinion: Top 100 Movies!![Both HW and BW mix/50 each]
    milind | May 29, 2011, 10:07 PM | 54 comments | 1,294 views

    I present a post here where you can simply jot down your fav top 100/top 50/top 20 movies[minimum number needed ] and thus we shall at the end of a month arrive at our top 100. The members here can decide by various debates and discussions later to include any other movie that might have slipped out of our minds. You have to post your 25 fav HW and 25 fav BW movies.Just have to spare some 15 odd minutes!!
    In this way we can create an enviable list of movies that can be taken as a reference point by any member new or old,and those who will join, to be able to pick and see them.

    If the MOD will be kind enough to make it a sticky post.

    List in no particular order.

    Here Goes mine: HW first (more…)




  • Stereo-scopic Filmmaking
    utkal | May 29, 2011, 2:32 PM | no comments | 399 views

    “I think 3D has now become quite a stable platform” – Vikram Bhatt

    By Philip Bode, May 28, 2011 – 15:33 IST

    He has been in the business for over half a decade, and clearly he has an ardent affection for dark stories. Vikram Bhatt has managed to hold up all aces against the wither of time with his latest film Haunted. After a succession of horror films like Raaz, 1920 and Shaapit, Vikram is now basking in the glory of triumph with his latest horror film. The talented director has made an impact in Bollywood, with profound depthness literally, with his latest 3D stereoscopic venture raking in an incredible Rs. 20 crores at the Box Office. The film revolves around a romantic plot where-in, the protagonist Rehan (Mahakshay) goes back in time to save his lady love Meera (Tia). Clad in his trademark denim shirt and jeans, Bollywood Hungama gets Vikram Bhatt to open up about the sensation to sell something, the tango rig and the terrifying success of Haunted.

    The director who has churned out hits like Ghulam and Raaz and is basking in the glory of success of his latest film Haunted says, “It has been quite a rollercoaster ride. At the time of the film’s release, I told my crew that there is nothing that could transpire that I have not seen. I have seen the worst flops and the biggest hits; I’m enjoying a success now. In its opening weekend, Haunted fetched an astounding 9 crores! People call my film a horror, but I beg to differ, I think it is more about selling a certain sensation that an audience can relate to and appreciate. Two different directors would like to sell different sensations; Raj Kumar Hirani adopts and sells a ‘feel good’ sensation in his films, while David Dhawan or even Priyadarshan or anyone from their ilk would like to sell ‘laughter’. I like to sell the sensation of ‘fear’, so I don’t think it’s a horror film. I would not mind making a film like, Jurassic Park or an edge of the seat thriller because; all these films will inspire and induce the sense of fear.”

    On shooting the horror flick in 3D, Vikram says, “I had an idea earlier called ‘Yamwar’ but Amin Hajee, who has written the script for Haunted came on board and changed the script of the film which was conceived last year around March or April. I chose to shoot Haunted in 3D because we wanted to take horror to another level. I’ve already done three horror films back to back with Raaz, 1920 and Shaapit. With this I thought to myself, what else I can give to the audience. Although there are means to convert a film into 3D as well, I chose to opt for shooting it in stereoscopic 3D because, I feel that converting into 3D is a conman’s way of making a 3D film. It cannot get close to shooting a film in stereoscopic 3D.” (more…)




  • In the global film scenario, Bollywood is viewed as comic relief
    utkal | May 29, 2011, 4:30 AM | one comment | 415 views

    Comedy of Cannes
    When will Bollywood’s status as comic relief at international film festivals change?
    Anupama Chopra

    The most visible, of course, are the stars who are trotted out by various companies—L’Oreal, Chivas Regal.
    I first went to the Cannes Film Festival in 1999. I had very little idea of the scope or complexity of the festival or even how to negotiate the maze of publicists, films and various sections. There were, I’m guessing, around ten or 20 Indians at the festival then.

    I remember the NFDC stall at the Marche Du Film or Cannes market, which was, rather unfortunately, situated right next to an entire corridor that showcased the latest in adult cinema. Actresses with reality-defying statistics and minimal clothes strutted up and down the porn corridor. Not surprisingly, few paid attention to the relatively less exciting fare offered by the NFDC.

    Despite the negligible numbers, India made its presence felt. Murali Nair won the coveted Camera d’Or or first film award for Marana Simhasanam, the story of a poor labourer in Kerala who steals out of hunger, somehow becomes the prime accused in a murder and then becomes the first man in the country to die by electric chair, developed with a loan from the World Bank and technological help from the US. He dies a hero and has a statue erected in his name. Marana Simhasanam, made over 15 days for £40,000 with a cast of non-professional actors, put India on the Cannes map. It was the first Indian film to win after Mira Nair’s Salaam Bombay!, which had picked up that prize 11 years earlier. (more…)




  • Derek Malcolm: The Bollywood Lie
    utkal | May 29, 2011, 4:11 AM | 73 comments | 1,442 views

    “It is, of course, a fairly common view in some Indian circles that the country has become a shining beacon to the world at large and that an ever more glamorous Bollywood has led the way in attracting attention not only to Indian films but to India itself. I’m not at all sure that the second half of the argument is really true.

    Behind the camera: (clockwise from above) Directors Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Ritwik Ghatak, Satyajit Ray, and more recently, Anurag Kashyap and Vishal Bhardwaj represent Indian cinema which is outside the Bollywood bracket of formulaic blockbusters.
    Ask most people in the UK what they know about India and they tend to have three pat answers. The first is that India is indeed a coming superpower, if often both bureaucratic and corrupt, but highly unlikely to beat China and the US in the world pecking order anytime soon.
    The second is that Indian cinema is indeed Bollywood, and nothing much else. And that means song, dance and star personas emitting romantic clichés. They’ve heard about the movies but they don’t actually go to see them.

    The third is that there are an awful lot of Indians in the UK who keep the newspaper shops open, drive much more carefully than they do in India for fear of the law and have provided the Brits with chicken tikka masala and other staples you can now buy in the supermarkets if you don’t want to visit the many restaurants (often actually run by Pakistanis and Bangladeshis) after a beery night out.

    I’m not saying these views are true. I’m saying that’s what the average Briton thinks. India equals emerging economic power, Bollywood and curry. (more…)



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